Performing the Rite of the Five Seals, or How I Spent Christmas Vacation

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The Annunciation, Gerard David, Courtesy The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Ritual is work. That’s what I learned in 2018 from my teacher Ylva Mara Radziszewski in their healing craft program available through Crow Song Healing Arts at the Cunning Crow Apothecary in Seattle. The two year program trains magical practitioners from various traditions to be spiritual counselors, applying magic as medicine. In my own Northern European heritage, this is akin to the cunning folk of centuries past. In 2018 I completed the first year of the program, a foundational course for decolonizing magic and reclaiming a practitioner’s connection to it. The healing craft program (aka witch school) concludes each year with a two-day initiation ceremony. Students give a presentation of some form that embodies what they’ve learned about themselves and their magic, and it was within this context that I found myself reclaiming and performing on myself the Rite of the Five Seals of Sethian Gnosticism.

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The Gnostic Witch’s Rite of the Five Seals

 

 

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The Baptism of Christ from a set of the Passion, Unknown Weaver, Courtesy Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Rite of the Five Seals is a baptism of Sethian Gnosticsm intended to activate the Christ consciousness of the initiate. I developed this interpretation of the ritual as part of my completion of the first year of a two-year healing craft program taught by Crow Song Healing Arts. You can read about that process here.

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Intellectual Integrity in New Age

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At the center of a labyrinth

It seems fitting that the first entry for this blog should address the reason why I have decided to start it in the first place. I am a public historian. For the past seven years I have worked in history museums, curating exhibits and developing public programs. These days I spend less time conducting research and more time teaching methodology and critical thinking. I am also a self-described gnostic who was raised in the New Age movement. More specifically, I was raised in a New Thought household and attended “church” at a Center for Spiritual Living. Over the years I have incorporated other philosophies into my own cosmology – theosophy, Gnosticism, Neopaganism, and ancestral magic. I don’t hide my occult interests, but I’m also aware of the reputation that New Age culture has of being shallow and anti-intellectual. I think to an extent that this reputation is justifiable, and yet I still actively incorporate these philosophies into my own life. And so, I began to reflect on what it is like to navigate between the world of professional research and the transcendent experiences of daily spiritual practice and ritual.

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